TALL SHIPS available for sails and tours

KALMAR NYCKEL is a re-creation of the first colonial Swedish settlement ship to arrive in America. Launched in the Fall of 1997 this ornately carved 17th century reproduction ship sails seasonally visiting ports from the Mid-Atlantic through New England while carrying out her mission of goodwill and providing educational opportunities for school children. Sailing Tickets: $60
KALMAR NYCKEL

KALMAR NYCKEL is a re-creation of the first colonial Swedish settlement ship to arrive in America. Launched in the Fall of 1997 this ornately carved 17th century reproduction ship sails seasonally visiting ports from the Mid-Atlantic through New England while carrying out her mission of goodwill and providing educational opportunities for school children.

Sailing Tickets: $60

PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II is a reconstruction of an early 19th-century Baltimore Clipper as was her predecessor the original PRIDE OF BALTIMORE. For nearly three decades PRIDE II has promoted historical maritime education, fostered economic development and tourism, and represented the people of Maryland in ports throughout the world. Sailing Tickets: $55
PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II

PRIDE OF BALTIMORE II is a reconstruction of an early 19th-century Baltimore Clipper as was her predecessor the original PRIDE OF BALTIMORE. For nearly three decades PRIDE II has promoted historical maritime education, fostered economic development and tourism, and represented the people of Maryland in ports throughout the world.

Sailing Tickets: $55

VIRGINIA is a reproduction of the last all sail vessel built for the Virginia Pilot Association.  The original ship sailed for the pilots from 1917-1926, training apprentice pilots in seamanship and navigation.  The reproduction, built in Norfolk between 2002-2004, is also used as an educational platform.  Her programs include courses in maritime history, marine science, maritime literature, and team-building for both students and adults.   Sailing Tickets: $50
VIRGINIA

VIRGINIA is a reproduction of the last all sail vessel built for the Virginia Pilot Association.  The original ship sailed for the pilots from 1917-1926, training apprentice pilots in seamanship and navigation.  The reproduction, built in Norfolk between 2002-2004, is also used as an educational platform.  Her programs include courses in maritime history, marine science, maritime literature, and team-building for both students and adults.

 

Sailing Tickets: $50

The square topsail schooner LYNX has been designed and built to interpret the general configuration and operation of a privateer schooner from the War of 1812.  Lynx sails as a living history museum and as a floating classroom for the study of historical, environmental, and ecological issues.   Sailing Tickets: $45
LYNX

The square topsail schooner LYNX has been designed and built to interpret the general configuration and operation of a privateer schooner from the War of 1812.  Lynx sails as a living history museum and as a floating classroom for the study of historical, environmental, and ecological issues.

 

Sailing Tickets: $45

SULTANA is a reproduction of its 1768 namesake used by the British Royal Navy to enforce the notorious tea taxes in the years preceding the American Revolution.  Built in Chestertown and launched in 2001, the new SULTANA’s mission is to educate students of all ages about the history and ecology of the Chesapeake Bay.   Sailing Tickets: $40
SULTANA

SULTANA is a reproduction of its 1768 namesake used by the British Royal Navy to enforce the notorious tea taxes in the years preceding the American Revolution.  Built in Chestertown and launched in 2001, the new SULTANA’s mission is to educate students of all ages about the history and ecology of the Chesapeake Bay.

 

Sailing Tickets: $40

Living Classroom’s Schooner and flagship LADY MARYLAND is a full-scale reproduction of a traditional 19th century Chesapeake Bay cargo schooner called a pungy.  LADY MARYLAND is part of a fleet of vessels used by Living Classroom Foundation that teach students about the history and environment of the Chesapeake.   Sailing Tickets: $35
LADY MARYLAND

Living Classroom’s Schooner and flagship LADY MARYLAND is a full-scale reproduction of a traditional 19th century Chesapeake Bay cargo schooner called a pungy.  LADY MARYLAND is part of a fleet of vessels used by Living Classroom Foundation that teach students about the history and environment of the Chesapeake.

 

Sailing Tickets: $35

SIGSBEE is a 1901 Chesapeake Bay skipjack originally used to dredge oysters and haul cargo on the Bay. Today, SIGSBEE sails the Chesapeake teaching students about the ecology, history, and economic importance of her local waters.   Sailing Tickets: $25
SIGSBEE

SIGSBEE is a 1901 Chesapeake Bay skipjack originally used to dredge oysters and haul cargo on the Bay. Today, SIGSBEE sails the Chesapeake teaching students about the ecology, history, and economic importance of her local waters.

 

Sailing Tickets: $25

TALL SHIP VIEWING

Chestertown Waterfront | Saturday, November 2 | 8:15pm
Watching fireworks over a historic harbor filled with Tall Ships while listing to great bluegrass music – what could be better? Fireworks are shot from Wilmer Park, making the Chestertown Read More
FireworksChestertown Waterfront | Saturday, November 2 | 8:15pm

Watching fireworks over a historic harbor filled with Tall Ships while listing to great bluegrass music – what could be better? Fireworks are shot from Wilmer Park, making the Chestertown Marina, and particularly the Downrigging Festival Village (ticket required) an ideal viewing location.

Chestertown Waterfront | Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 1-3 | 6:00-9:00pm
There is nothing quite like seeing the Downrigging Fleet illuminated along the Chestertown waterfront – for many visitors it is a highlight of the festival!
Tall Ships IlluminatedChestertown Waterfront | Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 1-3 | 6:00-9:00pm

There is nothing quite like seeing the Downrigging Fleet illuminated along the Chestertown waterfront – for many visitors it is a highlight of the festival!

Chestertown Waterfront
Friday, November 1 | 4:30-5:00pm Saturday, November 2 | 12:30-1:00pm | 4:30-5:00pm Sunday, November 3 | 3:00-3:30pm   Come down to the waterfront and view the Tall Ships as they Read More
Tall Ships Parade HomeChestertown Waterfront

Friday, November 1 | 4:30-5:00pm

Saturday, November 2 | 12:30-1:00pm | 4:30-5:00pm

Sunday, November 3 | 3:00-3:30pm

 

Come down to the waterfront and view the Tall Ships as they make their way back to Chestertown following their sails.  This isn’t a formal parade, but you will get a great look at all of the ships underway.

EXHIBIT VESSELS dockside viewing only

27′ Electric “saloon” launch built on the Eastern Shore in 1981. Loosely modeled after the launches found on 19th century steam yachts. Her hull is fiberglass and her superstructure is mahogany and pine. She has a 4 HP electric motor driven by 48 volts of batteries. The launch cruises at 4 knots and can sustain that for approximately 8 hours.
Adroit

27′ Electric “saloon” launch built on the Eastern Shore in 1981. Loosely modeled after the launches found on 19th century steam yachts. Her hull is fiberglass and her superstructure is mahogany and pine. She has a 4 HP electric motor driven by 48 volts of batteries. The launch cruises at 4 knots and can sustain that for approximately 8 hours.

E.E. Moore is a sharpie schooner designed and built by John E. Swain (builder of the schooner SULTANA) and inspired by historic sharpies documented by Howard Chapelle. Drawing just two feet of water E.E. Moore is ideal for exploring the rivers and creeks of the Chesapeake Bay. Named after Swain’s grandfather, the schooner was launched in 2013 after eight years of construction at Swain’s shop in Millington, MD.
E.E. Moore

E.E. Moore is a sharpie schooner designed and built by John E. Swain (builder of the schooner SULTANA) and inspired by historic sharpies documented by Howard Chapelle. Drawing just two feet of water E.E. Moore is ideal for exploring the rivers and creeks of the Chesapeake Bay. Named after Swain’s grandfather, the schooner was launched in 2013 after eight years of construction at Swain’s shop in Millington, MD.

Gwylan is a 28 foot L. Francis Herreshoff H-28 ketch built in 1977 on the Sheepscot River in Westport, Maine by McKie (Nick) Roth. She very closely follows LFH’s original 1942 plans except for the addition of the short bowsprit. She is planked in white cedar over oak framing, with bright mahogany deckhouse and trim. She normally sails out of Riverton Yacht Club on the Delaware River opposite northeast Philadelphia, and is a handy vessel Read More
Gwylan

Gwylan is a 28 foot L. Francis Herreshoff H-28 ketch built in 1977 on the Sheepscot River in Westport, Maine by McKie (Nick) Roth. She very closely follows LFH’s original 1942 plans except for the addition of the short bowsprit. She is planked in white cedar over oak framing, with bright mahogany deckhouse and trim.

She normally sails out of Riverton Yacht Club on the Delaware River opposite northeast Philadelphia, and is a handy vessel for day-sailing or simple cruising for one or two people.

For many seasons her owner has single-handed her on week-long cruises on the Delaware and all over the Upper Chesapeake. She spends her winters at Cutts and Case in Oxford, MD.

Island lady is a 42 foot wooden Chesapeake Bay Deadrise built in 1970 by Francis O’Neal Dean of Wingate, Md in Dorchester county. O’Neal Dean, along with his peer O’Neal Jones, learned the trade from Bronza Parks, also from Wingate (pronounced “wingget”). Island lady was built in the traditional upside down fashion and then turned up and finished . She was built for Captain Warren Sadler of Kent Island and worked as a fishing charter Read More
Island Lady

Island lady is a 42 foot wooden Chesapeake Bay Deadrise built in 1970 by Francis O’Neal Dean of Wingate, Md in Dorchester county. O’Neal Dean, along with his peer O’Neal Jones, learned the trade from Bronza Parks, also from Wingate (pronounced “wingget”). Island lady was built in the traditional upside down fashion and then turned up and finished . She was built for Captain Warren Sadler of Kent Island and worked as a fishing charter boat for close to thirty years. She is still powered by the original 318 Chrysler and cruises at 8 knots.
Purchased in 2009 from the Sadler family, Island Lady’s rebuilding is ongoing. She’s out of Tilghman Creek in Claiborne, Md and used for pleasure and charters.

  The boat is a reconstruction of a 18th century ship’s jolly boat from the ship Columbia. Under the command of Captain Gray the Columbia explored the mouth of the Columbia River in 1792. This type boat was used mainly to ferry personnel to and from the ship or for other small scale activities. “Jolly” was designed and built by Greg Foster of Northwest Historic Watercraft in 1991. She is a 17 foot wooden lapstrake Read More
Jollyboat Vigilant “Jolly”

 

The boat is a reconstruction of a 18th century ship’s jolly boat from the ship Columbia. Under the command of Captain Gray the Columbia explored the mouth of the Columbia River in 1792. This type boat was used mainly to ferry personnel to and from the ship or for other small scale activities.

“Jolly” was designed and built by Greg Foster of Northwest Historic Watercraft in 1991. She is a 17 foot wooden lapstrake open boat with rowing stations for six oarsmen and a stern seat for a coxswain and a passenger. For sailing she can step two lug rigged masts. The forward mast is a dipping lug (82 sq. ft) and the aft mast is a standing lug (40 sq. ft). She is armed with one bow gun.

The boat has appeared in PBS – American Experience: Alexander Hamilton, a special for National Geographic’s Ultimate Explorer series Civil War Gold: The sinking of the SS Republic and was on the set for Season 1 of AMC’s Turn.

 

Molly Malone is a replica of Coquina – a gaff rigged centerboard ketch designed and built by Nathanael Herreshoff for his personal use in 1890. Built and rigged of modern materials to plans published by Doug Hylan and Maynard Bray, Molly Malone is in all other respects faithful to Herreshoff’s original design. Of particular interest is her light but versatile unstayed rig which is simple to set and strike and can be configured as either Read More
Molly Malone

Molly Malone is a replica of Coquina – a gaff rigged centerboard ketch designed and built by Nathanael Herreshoff for his personal use in 1890. Built and rigged of modern materials to plans published by Doug Hylan and Maynard Bray, Molly Malone is in all other respects faithful to Herreshoff’s original design. Of particular interest is her light but versatile unstayed rig which is simple to set and strike and can be configured as either a ketch or, if conditions warrant, a sloop using the alternate step for the main mast. Fast, seaworthy, and capable, Coquina was one of Herreshoff’s favorite designs and was a boat he enjoyed sailing on the waters around his Narragansett Bay home and shop for many years. Now, over a hundred years later, it remains a beautiful design that can hardly be improved upon and is a living tribute to the enduring genius of “The Wizard of Bristol.”

Moondance is a 1966 Chesapeake Bay Deadrise. She is a 38 foot version of O’Neil Jones’ coveted 42 foot charter boat design, of which he became famous. These boats were built upside down in a small shed at the head of a large tidal drainage ditch (the birth canal) in Wingate, a small village in Dorchester County. Her bottom is cross-planked with Atlantic White cedar and has yellow pine chines and chine boards. They were Read More
Moondance

Moondance is a 1966 Chesapeake Bay Deadrise. She is a 38 foot version of O’Neil Jones’ coveted 42 foot charter boat design, of which he became famous. These boats were built upside down in a small shed at the head of a large tidal drainage ditch (the birth canal) in Wingate, a small village in Dorchester County. Her bottom is cross-planked with Atlantic White cedar and has yellow pine chines and chine boards. They were then flipped right-side-up and the long tedious strip-planking of the hull-sides would commence.

To this day an “O’Neil Jones” boat will lift eyebrows and spirits of those of us in the know. The charter boat design that Mr. Jones developed became the ultimate Bay boat, laid out to take six fishing for the day, along with a skipper and mate. Their distinct wide open flare at the bow and carefully constructed V-grooved fir canopies became the signatures of an O’Neil Jones boat. They were a “cut-above” other Charter boats providing ample stable room for those aboard. They would “troll” like no other boat whether in the throws of a frenzied fish-break under a cloud of gulls or on an evening pass under the Bay Bridge in a summer’s ebbing tide.

Moondance currently spends much of her time cruising the Chester River.